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INNER MONGOLIA

L ocated in the northern part of China, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region has an area of 1.183 million square kilometers, accounting for 12.3% of the total and ranking third in China. Like a belt extending 2400 km from east to west and 1700 km from north to south, this region borders 8 provinces/autonomous regions in China’s northeast, north and northwest. It borders on Russia and Mongolia with a total borderline of 4,200 km. Read More Below.


OVERVIEW

L ocated in the northern part of China, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region has an area of 1.183 million square kilometers, accounting for 12.3% of the total and ranking third in China. Like a belt extending 2400 km from east to west and 1700 km from north to south, this region borders 8 provinces/autonomous regions in China’s northeast, north and northwest. It borders on Russia and Mongolia with a total borderline of 4,200 km.

I nner Mongolia is rich in tourism resources, including grasslands, forests, deserts, rivers, lakes, hot springs, ice and snow, border lines, ethnic elegance, and historic relics, and multiple world-level scenic spots such as Genghis Khan Mausoleum, Zhaojun Tomb, ancient Great Wall, Wudang Lamasery, Five-Pagoda Temple, and Beizi Temple. Hulunbuir Grassland is the most beautiful natural grassland in China, and the unique scenic spots like Hexigten Banner World Geo-park, and Aershan Volcano Ruins Geo-park are of high scientific value.

GEOGRAPHY

GEOGRAPHY

T he Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region is located in the northern border area of China. Long and narrow, its landform stretches from northeast to southwest. Starting from 126°04′ East Longitude in the east, its western point is at 97°12′ East Longitude. The span is 28°52′ longitudes. The straight line distance between the eastern point and western point is over 2,400 km. The Region extends from 37°24′ North Latitude in the south to 53°23′ North Latitude in the north, covering 15°59′ latitudes and 1,700 km of linear distance.

T he total area of the Region is 1.183 million km2, accounting for 12.3% of China’s land area. It is the third largest provincial-level region in China. Its eastern, southern, and western parts run across the three north (northeast, north, and northwest) regions and are adjacent to eight provinces and autonomous regions of Heilongjiang, Jilin, Liaoning, Hebei, Shanxi, Shaanxi, Ningxia and Gansu successively. Inner Mongolia is close to Beijing and Tianjin. Its northern parts border on Mongolia and the Russian Federation. The boundary line within the Region is as long as 4,200 km.

OVERVIEWCLIMATE

CLIMATE

D ue to its unique geography and topography, this region has a complex and diverse climate focusing on temperate continental monsoon climate. Spring sees sudden high temperature and strong wind, summer experiences short heat and concentrated precipitation, autumn often witnesses sudden cold and early frost while winter registers longer cold and damp.

I t has an annual precipitation of 100mm – 500 mm, frost-free period of 80 to 150 days, and sunshine of 2700 hours or more. Greater Khingan Mountains and Yinshan Mountains basically divide its climate into 2 quite different types, with the temperature and rainfall east of the former and north of the latter significantly lower than that west of the former and south of the latter.

GEOGRAPHYCULTURE

CULTURE

T he central and western part of Inner Mongolia, especially Hetao Basin, used to be impacted by the Chinese agricultural culture originated in South China, and alternately ruled by the Huns, Xianbei, Khitan, Jurchen, Turkic and Mongol nomads. Strictly speaking, the eastern part of Inner Mongolia was ruled by Manchu whose local history narratives focused on the alternation between different tribes of nomadic culture instead of the conflicts between the nomadic culture and the Chinese agricultural culture.Located in the northernmost part of China, bordering Mongolia and Russia in the north, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, referred to as “Meng”, has an area of 1.18 million square kilometers, with Hohhot as its capital and mainly hosting Mongolian and Han people. Since its most parts have an elevation of 1000 meters above sea level, it is also known as Inner Mongolia Plateau. Before the Spring and Autumn Period and Warring States Period (770BC to 256BC), today’s Inner Mongolia mainly hosted nomads, such as the Huns and the Xianbei nomads. In the late Warring States period, the states of Yan, Zhao and Qin expanded to today’s Inner Mongolia. Later the Han people in the Central Plains began to settle down in the southern part of today’s Inner Mongolia. As traditional nomads, Mongolian people maintain their traditional habits, such as yurts, greeting gift hada, singing and greeting. Their food culture can be accurately summarized as “Holding high gold and silver vessels filled with spirits, enjoy fried rice, milky tea and grilled meat”.

CLIMATETOURIST SEASON

TOURIST SEASON

T he landscapes of Inner Mongolia over the four seasons of a year demonstrate different charms. Tourists need to realize them attentively. Usually summer is the best season for travelling in Inner Mongolia and it is the best time to enjoy the sights in Inner Mongolian grassland. Inner Mongolia covers a vast geographical area. There’s particularly a large span from the east to the west. So the optimal time periods are also different for visiting different parts of Inner Mongolia in order to look at the sceneries. Roughly Inner Mongolia can be divided into two tourism areas: the grassland area and the desert area.

T he three seasons of spring, summer and autumn are almost connected in the grassland area. From May to September every year, the climate in the grassland area is comparatively mild and the weather is cool and fine. This is the best time for tourism in the grassland area. The landscapes in the grassland area are exceptionally fascinating over the three months of July to September. During this period of time, the water supply is sufficient and the grass is exuberant. Flocks of cattle and sheep are wandering easily on the grassland. This is really the scene of “cattle and sheep emerge when the wind sweeps over the grassland” as described in an ancient folk song. Tourists will also see the spectacles of Nadam, a traditional Mongolian entertainment fair held once a year, and other events. The climate in the desert area is nasty. The sand storms often occur in spring and the temperature in summer is too high for people to endure, while the weather is exceptionally cold in winter.

E xtreme conditions such as blizzards turn up. Therefore, autumn is the only best time for tourism in the desert area. The wind is soft and the sunshine is lovely in autumn. Tourists are walking in the desert to experience the different charms of the desert in the golden season of autumn. They may appreciate the magnificent, miraculous and beautiful attractions in the desert like the strong winds, oasis in the sea of sand, or even a mirage.

CULTURE